Variable spring or summer flowering bulbous perennial with strap-shaped leaves and up to 4 funnel-shaped, drooping, bright red flowers with a large green-white stain in the throat, the lobes to 13cm across, on a stem to 50cm long. Many are found in underbrush, while others prefer full sun. 10 (1759) and Species Plantarum ed. Thus Amaryllis L. is the correct name for the South African genus, not the South American genus (Hippeastrum). Click below on a thumbnail map or name for species profiles. [52] Brazil also produces 17 million Hippeastrum bulbs annually. is an accepted name This name is the accepted name of a … had described c. 1781-3 (unpublished)[40] but soon after appearing in the Hortus Kewensis of 1789. Following Filippo Parlatore in 1845, the name Leopoldia was used for a genus of grape hyacinth species, allied to Muscari. Note too, that Hippeastrum can also be grown in the ground in temperate areas. Linnaeus was aware in 1738 that several species were called Belladonna, but named this one Amaryllis reginae in the Systema Naturae ed. ... Barbados lily Hippeastrum reginae . [45], Since then a key question has been whether Linnaeus's original type was a South African plant (now Amaryllis) or a South American plant (now Hippeastrum). [26] In the gynaecium, the ovary is inferior and trilocular with pluriovulate locules. Traub Amaryllis spectabilis G.Lodd. [30][37] "Amaryllis" is also used in the name of some societies devoted to the genus Hippeastrum. By contrast the generic name Amaryllis applies to bulbs from South Africa, usually grown outdoors. [49][50][51], While interspecific hybrids of Hippeastrum are relatively common, hybridization with other genera of Amaryllidaceae are more rare. Common Name: amaryllis . It has been crossed with both cybister and single flower cultivars to produce hybrids with unusual striping.[90][91]. Hippeastrum (/ˌhɪpiːˈæstrəm/)[17] is a genus of about 90 species and over 600 hybrids and cultivars of perennial herbaceous bulbous plants. Single, double, and miniature bulbs are the ones typically sold by nurseries and other stores for the holidays in December and for Valentine's Day and Easter. In 1803 John Sims claimed Curtis had made a mistake in this attribution, and that; "this name was given from the remarkable likeness the front view of it has to a star of some of the orders of knight-hood; an appearance well expressed by JACQUIN's figure in the Hortus Schoenbrunnensis"[33][34], Despite much speculation, there is no definitive explanation of either Linnaeus fils or Herbert's thinking. Seeds Cultivars of Hippeastrum are popular indoor ornamental plants prized for their large brightly colored flowers (including red, pink, salmon, orange and white). Johnson's amaryllis is another name for this bulb, in honor of the hybridizer and English watchmaker, Mr. Johnson. His hybrid was being cultivated in the US by the mid-nineteenth century. × Hippeastrelia is the name given to this cross.[30][52][53][54]. Common name: Hippeastrums, amaryllis, hippies Botanic name: Hippeastrum cultivars Description: Bold trumpet-shaped flowers appear in late spring to summer on hollow stems 40cm to 50cm (18-22″) tall. Hippeastrum petiolatum is a flowering perennial herbaceous bulbous plant, in the family Amaryllidaceae, native to Venezuela, Bolivia, Peru and Brazil. For instance the 'knight's star' has been compared to Linnaeus' decoration as a Knight of the Order of the Polar Star. [100][101][102] The widely used logo represents a double image of a head and shoulders as the flower of a growing and vibrant plant. (syn. More recently micropropagation in vitro has been used on a commercial scale. Hippeastrum cultivars and species can be grown inside in pots or outside in warmer climates (Hardiness 7B-11). Plants grown from this method take three to four years to bloom. Although the market is dominated by the Netherlands,[71] and South Africa,[52] other areas of production include Israel, Japan and the United States (Florida). [18] The name Hippeastrum, given to it by William Herbert, means "knight's star", although precisely what Herbert meant by the name is not certain. [23] The tepals are united at the base to form a short tube, usually with a rudimentary scaly paraperigonium[24] with fimbriae[25] or a callose ridge present at the throat. The plant's leaves should continue to grow after the flowers have faded. The miniature evergreen Hippeastrum papilio or "butterfly amaryllis" whose petals resemble a butterfly (papilio) has a unique color and pattern with broad rose-burgundy center stripes and striations of pale green on the upper petals and narrow stripes on the bottom three. Syst. H.E. This section is empty. Most Hippeastrum bulbs are tunicate (a protective dry outer layer and fleshy concentric inner scales or leaf bases). also has detailed information on botanic features such as leaf and flower and fruit with glossaries describing the terms. In temperate climes these can be placed outside in the summer, and after a dormancy period, be induced to rebloom inside in the winter. Unplaced names include Hippeastrum ugentii,[62] considered in the Kew World Checklist of Selected Plant Families as probably a Crinum. This name and attribution was first published by William Aiton in 1789, in his Hortus Kewensis. Seeds are generally sown in early summer in seedbeds, and then transplanted to larger containers. The cultivar 'Clown' (Double Galaxy Group)[93] (white with red stripes) has received the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit. The Plants Database includes the following 4 species of Hippeastrum . These two species were notable for large flowers that were wide open and relatively symmetrical. [86][87][88], Most modern cultivars lack any fragrance although 'Dancing Queen' represents an exception. Hippeastrum reginae (L.) Herb. [40] This work commenced in 1819 with the contributions of the English botanist, the Revd. Description The amaryllis talked about on this page are actually hippeastrum bulbous plants. Overview. Other species such as Hippeastrum reticulatum are self-pollinating, reproducing by distributing seed. William Herbert in Curtis's Botanical Magazine[44] which he expanded in 1821 in The Botanical Register, identifying 14 species of the new genus of Hippeastrum, and only leaving three species in Amaryllis. 2) In 1779 Johann Müller only wrote that the common name for this plant was Belladonna, and that it was described in Species Plantarum. [39], The taxonomy of the genus is complicated. Hippeastrum reginae (L.) Herb. de Didot Jeune Edition: 2. éd. [56] Baker both reduced the original number of species of Herbert, but also enlarged the genus by adding in other genera such as Habranthus, Phycella, Rhodophiala and Rhodolirion (also called Rhodolirium, and subsequently moved to Rhodophilia),[57] which he included as separate sections of Hippeastrum. [78], Intense cultivation of a number of species, particularly from Brazil, Bolivia and Peru, has occurred because of the appearance and size of the flowers, resulting in many hybrids and cultivars. Subsequent care is as for new bulbs, as described above. Waray hini subspecies nga nakalista. Commercially, only cultivars that produce at least three bulbils on the mother bulb are used for this form of propagation. Hippeastrum reginae in the Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN), U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service. The double flowers from Japan are particularly beautiful. Espesye sa tanom nga asparagos nga una nga gihulagway ni Carl von Linné, ug nga gihatagan sa eksakto nga ngalan ni [[Herb ang Hippeastrum reginae. Plant database entry for Mexican Lily (Hippeastrum reginae) with one image and 23 data details. [66][verification needed], Some species, such as the Uruguayan Hippeastrum petiolatum, are sterile and unable to produce seeds. Amaryllis (Hippeastrum) Hippeastrum, Large Flowering Amaryllis, Double Amaryllis, Cybister Amaryllis, Galaxy Amaryllis, Diamond Amaryllis, Spider Amaryllis (Hippeastrum) Amaryllis bulbs (Hippeastrum) are flowers of choice to take the gray chill out of winter with their audacious, sexy tropical-looking blossoms in the dead of winter! A bulb needs to produce large, healthy leaves in the summer growing season before it can send up a scape the following year. They generally have large fleshy bulbs and tall broad leaves, generally evergreen, and large red or purple flowers. Even when plants are thriving outdoors in temperate climates, dormancy can be induced by withholding watering and fertilising in the northern hemisphere autumn, and bringing indoors to a cool environment prior to the first frost. [77], Hippeastrum cultivars and species can be grown inside in pots or outside in warmer climates (Hardiness 7B-11). For temperatures, the Strelitzia reginaelikes it warm in the 70 to 90-degree range. [52], The Reginae strain hybrids were produced by Jan de Graaff and his two sons in the Netherlands in the mid 19th century by crossing Hippeastrum vitatum and Hippeastrum striatum with Hippeastrum psittacinum and some of the better hybrids available in Europe at the time. [52], Hippeastrum breeding began in 1799 when Arthur Johnson, a watchmaker in Prescot, England, crossed Hippeastrum reginae with Hippeastrum vitattum, obtaining hybrids that were later given the name Hippeastrum × 'Johnsonii' [79] (Johnson's amaryllis, 'hardy amaryllis' or St. Joseph's lily). Hippeastrum species are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including Spodoptera picta (crinum grub)[69] as well as Pseudococcidae (mealybugs), large, and small narcissus bulb flies (Eumerus strigatus and E. funeralis), thrips, mites, aphids, snails and slugs. 107), International Union for the Conservation of Nature, "What Do You Say to a Naked Lady? His 1878 classification included 47 species, reduced to 38 by 1888. Dutch bulbs usually produce flowers first, then, after they have finished blooming (hysteranthous), the plant will begin growing leaves. For many years there was confusion among botanists over the generic names Amaryllis and Hippeastrum, resulting in the common name amaryllis used for cultivars of this genus, while the generic name Amaryllis was applied to bulbs from South Africa, usually grown outdoors. (Rosaceae) Autumn Joy Sedum : ... Strelitzia reginae (Streliziaceae) Black-Eyed Susan: Rudbekia spp. L 63)", "World Checklist of Selected Plant Families: Hippeastrum", "Huntington's Disease Association Northern Ireland", International Union for Conservation of Nature, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Hippeastrum&oldid=991284911, Articles with incomplete citations from June 2020, Wikipedia articles needing page number citations from June 2020, Short description is different from Wikidata, Articles containing potentially dated statements from November 2013, All articles containing potentially dated statements, Wikipedia articles needing factual verification from June 2020, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 29 November 2020, at 07:29. [70], Twin scales [78], The bulb is tender and should not be exposed to frost, but is otherwise easy to grow with large rewards for small efforts, especially those that bloom inside during the winter months. Some species are found as far north as Mexico and the West Indies. In 1753 Carl Linnaeus created the name Amaryllis belladonna, the type species of the genus Amaryllis, in his Species Plantarum along with eight other Amaryllis species. [97][98] Hippeastrum puniceum may also have therapeutic properties as it has been used in folk medicine to treat swellings and wounds. Herbert proposed to call the genus, which he distinguished from Linnaeus' Amaryllis, Hippeastrum, or "knight's-star-lily". 2 (1762). [30] This 'equine' connection refers to Carl Linnaeus the Younger who had named (in an unpublished manuscript) a West Indian species as Amaryllis equestris, because of its similarity to the African genus Amaryllis.